$2 Million in Legislative Funding To Provide More Fresh Produce to Hungry Minnesotans

May 19, 2014 By: Sara Horwath Category: WordPress Import

Two million dollars will provide more fresh vegetables and fruits to our neighbors in need, thanks to a new program that will pay growers their costs to harvest donated fresh produce that would otherwise go unused. Second Harvest Heartland led the six Feeding America food banks that serve the state, with support from Hunger-Free Minnesota, in seeking legislation to create this program, through the “Farm to Food Shelf” bill. Chief authored by Representative Jeanne Poppe of Austin and Senators Matt Schmit of Red Wing, Lyle Koenen of Clara City and Kent Eken of Twin Valley, and co-authored by a bipartisan group of 45 legislators from around Minnesota, the bill’s new money will be instrumental in moving millions of pounds of food to eligible food shelves and other meal programs statewide within the next three years.

More than 1 in 10 Minnesota families are food insecure—meaning they lack sustained access to the food needed for a healthy, productive life. Food insecurity is highest in rural Minnesota and the Twin Cities urban core, and for seniors and young families with children. More than 40 percent of those served by Minnesota food shelves are children.



“Second Harvest Heartland sought this legislation because we are committed to pursuing innovative ways to bring more healthy and nutritious food to our hungry neighbors,” said Rob Zeaske, Second Harvest Heartland CEO. “The need is still high in our communities, and we look forward to working with generous growers who want to donate food out of the ground but need help with costs related to ‘picking and packing.’ “




In advocating for this bill over the past 5 months, Second Harvest Heartland received strong support from the Minnesota cluster of Feeding America food banks—including Channel One in Rochester and Second Harvest Northern Lakes in Duluth—and from Hunger-Free Minnesota. Hunger-Free Minnesota’s data showing missing meals by census tract in each legislator’s district proved highly motivational to legislators.

“Hunger in Minnesota is often hidden, but this data and the efforts of many supportive legislators brought hunger into view,” said Zeaske. “Hunger is the largest solvable problem in Minnesota, because we already have the food to solve it.”

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